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20110701
20110731
Search Results 0 to 13 of about 14 (some duplicates have been removed)
pakistan's spy agency to run an illegal lobbying operation. officials instructed him to make campaign donations to congress and develop sources at the white house and the state department. prosecutors charged another united states citizen, of recruiting people to funnel money to the organization but he is in pakistan. and now the news from washington, dc, steve. what do we know of the defendants? >>reporter: the high profile figure was the head of a lobbying group that promoted pakistan in the dispute with india over the fate of kashmir. he was often seen in public meeting and greeting members of congress and donating money and told the f.b.i. he had no connection to the pakistani government but an f.b.i. affidavit refers to a witness who says he, the witness, participated to obscure the origin of money transfers by the pakistani intelligence agency to this man to use as a lobbyist to influence the interests of the government of pakistan. he appeared in court in alexandria, virginia. the law that was violated was being unregistered agent of a foreign government. plenty of people in wa
laden's compound in pakistan and terror group is now within reach. david is live from kabul, afghanistan. >> reporter: the duly appointed defense secretary arrived here a few hours ago to find out for himself the situation on the ground here. he has brief talks with military officials including david petraeus and then he went straight into a meeting with the afghan president hamid karzai. their discussions included the transition of nato held areas of afghan control starting in july but also the drawdown of u.s. troops over the next year. he says he hopes to drive the taliban into peace talks over that period. he also said he was upbeat about prospects of defeating al-qaeda if they can capture and kill remaining leaders. >> i would say somewhere around 10 to 20 key leaders, between pakistan, yemen, so somalia and north africa, if we can go after them, i think we really can strategically defeat al-qaeda. >> he also said the targeting of leaders such as the al-qaeda chief ayman al-zawahri continues to limit their ability to conduct attacks. he may just go well over the border in pakistan's
million in military aide to pakistan. relations between the two countries took a major hit after u.s. forces killed osama bin laden in pakistan. that was back in may. those ties are on even shake yes, sir ground. peter doocy has more from washington. >> reporter: $800 million less. that is what pakistan is going to be getting us from military aide, getting shaved off the 2 plus billion, now the white house says is because they could be more helpful in rounding up terrorists and they gave hundred u.s. army trainers the boot in the last few weeks. >> obviously they have been an important ally but they have been a victim of enormous amounts of terrorism but they have taken steps that have given us reason to pause on some of the aid which we were given to their military. >> the communication breakdown regarding our raid on their soil to kill bin laden, some critics say maybe they knew there was all along. brand-new secretary of defense, l leon panetta says we don't know enough yet. >> everybody has suspicions about pakistanis, what they knew reality is their are investigations being co
is happening with pakistan. there are questions about whether or not pakistan is really our friend or our foe. the second thing about foreign policy experience, you do not have to have had extensive foreign policy experience to know how to listen to the experts. president obama just announced his withdrawal plan from afghanistan. he didn't listen to general petraeus. he didn't listen to admiral mullen. they have again on record as saying it was more aggressive than they thought. common sense says, you don't reduce your force by a third and announce it to your enemy in order to fulfill some political promise. what kind of foreign experience do you need to listen to your experts in order to be able to make the right decision? >> sean: you came under fire early in the campaign. i never saw you mad before. you got sick and tired of answering the question about muslims in your administration. >> yes. >> sean: a reporter asked you again and you off on him a little. tell us your real position and what happened? >> throughout my business career i've always hired the best people, irrespective of race,
-qaida network was angry and frustrated by the cia campaign in the tribal areas of pakistan and achieving the objective to take senior operatives off of the battlefield and keep the group under pressure so it is difficult for operatives to plan, train and raise money. uma, it is no coincidence that we are starting an identical campaign in yemen. yemen is one of the rising threatt hubs and americans are front and center in al-awaki who i describe is leader of al-qaida 2.0. he was overlooked in a key player in the al-qaida network. why was he not taken seriously? >> one of the things i lay out in the book behind the scene was our . what i showed in interviews and phone records. al-awlaki's contact with the hijackers were evidence of a personful relationship. when he return to the pentagon in 2002 as part of the outreach to moderate muslims, it was like a thief returnns to the scene of the crime, he was contacted with three of the five hijackers on flight 577 that went in the building. >>> and one of the things that is interesting, you want people to understand that this is not simply a ques
the speckter of the isi in pakistan. >> this morning, new evidence suggests the bombs were planted at a bus shelter, also on a motorcycle and near a parked car. this really shows that these devices were designed to cause maximum casualties and they all went off within a span of 15 minutes, and again, the simultaneous nature of the attacks is a signature of terrorism, heather. heather: they did their jobs. catherine, what does this attack mean for the u.s.? >> well, look, immediately in washington, the focus went back to three years ago and these attacks in mumbai, that was a series of attacks orchestrated by ten pakistani militants armed with cell phones, hand guns and backpacks with explosives. analysts here say if this latest attack causes friction between india and pakistan that could be serious trouble for the u.s. let's listen: >> if the attack were a cause to try to provoke a crisis between india and pakistan that would have major implications for the united states. we do not want to see those two countries go into another crisis and perhaps fight another war, which they've done three
signal nato weakness, implications in places like syria and egypt and have implications like pakistan, as well. a lot rides on this more than just getting rid of khadafy, who yet again in past days has called for a return to terrorism something he used before and is threatening again. one more reason to get rid of him. >> gregg: last question -- there is a new study by the eisenhower research project and it concluded that u.s. involvement in afghanistan, pakistan and iraq has cost up to 4 trillion dollars over the past decade. your reaction to that? >> i think that study is badly flawed for a number of reasons. it's counting costs we would have incurred anyway for the existence of the military. it does focus on the potential explosion of medical costs. that is something i think even defenders of the defense department have said for some time that is an area of cost cutting we ought to be looking at. badly flawed but there are points worth taking into account going forward. >> gregg: unless anyone thinks we forgets, more than 6,000 american lives in various wars over the past decade, h
it comes to al-qaeda, core leadership in pakistan, we have made the kind of strides that we need to make to be in a position of thinking we can win. speaking of vang wishing shadowy enemies. >> isn't that the metaphor for what we are talking about. terror is a shadow and we are a big, adorable dog chasing a shadow? that made no sense at all. moynihan, time for a parade? >> really? time for a parade? like we defeated al-qaeda parade with blimps and balloons and things? you have actually a bad track record with things. >> it is not over you think? >> i don't know. i was going to say something bad about the cia, but he is right there. >> i just don't put a lot of stock in them. >> thanks for turning off your phone. >> calling the cia. >> what is the evidence of this beyond the bin laden killing. i was going to make some jokes, but i feel bad talking about al-qaeda. >> do you still worry about terror attacks? i do and i always will. >> absolutely. we cutoff the head of the snake. and i think it is a great symbolic blow, but we all know we are not out of the water yet. al-qaeda is not one gro
certainly hurt the al-qaeda terrorist organization, in pakistan and afghanistan. but anwar al-awlaki is alive and well in yemen and he is planning additional attacks against americans. is the franchise there now the lead in al-qaeda and how dangerous and what can we do? >> al-qaeda is somewhat diffuse in the islamist most of the time. yemen a fertile ground. it does seem to be emerging as headquarters of sorts. yemen as a state doesn't exist right now. it was an iffy topic when it had a president but it essentially doesn't right now. so al-qaeda finding an open door. president obama came out and said the tide of war is receding but nobody gave that message to the islamist terrorists. we this had the christmas day bombing, not the one on the flight but the on other one on fed ex shipments. >> gregg: speaking of terrorists let's talk about libya and moammar khadafy who says he is willing to talk to america but he refuses to give up his position. so what is the point of talking to the guy? >> this has been going for five months. people have said that khadafy is losing or close to
-level officials within al qaeda and obviously this drone campaign been ongoing in pakistan and some cases yemen, we've taken out something like 1200 fighters from al qaeda including senior leaders. jon: right. >> this is all good news. but again the ideology of radical islam lives on and so do these affiliate groups. that is the challenge ahead of us. jon: if you take out those leaders, and we have been very successful in doing that, if you take out people who have experience going back to the russian-afghan war, take out the people who know how to motivate and organization and maybe build a bomb be, pretty soon you're left with bunch of 18, 20-year-old kids who may have the desire but don't necessarily have the knowledge to continue terrorism campaign? >> well, you know i think you could make that argument but you could also argue you have a number of people who gained experience in afghanistan. people who have gained experience and by the way, fighting in this more recent war, not in the war in the 1980s against the soviets. but rather fighting against the united states and allied forces. you
. what was his connection to pakistan? there are so many unanswered questions about his overseas connections and what he was really doing and his radicalization during the process in which the military did nothing. and finally, the information the joint terrorism task force had about mr. al laak can i and communications with major hasan at fort hood. why wasn't it shared with general cohen at fort hood when it could have stopped the murder of 13 soldiers? jon: a lot of questions there. let's hope you get answers. congressman, thank you. >> i appreciate it. alisyn: here's what is happening now. joint chiefs chairman admiral mike mullen giving a briefing on the wars in iraq and afghanistan and the defense department budget as the military faces questions about the mounting cost of american involvement in the libyan conflict as well. national security correspondent jennifer griffin live from the pentagon for us. jennifer, what did we learn from this briefing? >> reporter: alisyn, he didn't really speak about the libyan conflict for or the cost of it. discussion was with the pentagon
the border with pakistan. this is an area they could turn over. they are doing it and it's a test case. canadians ceased their combat operations last week. they are going to replace their combat troops with 950 trainers. everybody is looking at the exit since the united states announceded we're pulling out. >> jamie: 10,000 of our troops will leave at the end of this year. and that has begun. how is it going? >> it's too early to tell. what happened is 650 troops left. they will not be replaced. that is the first increment of the 10,000 that you mentioned. so it will be, hopefully it will be more of a gradual reduction, so that we can meter the troops out as we take account of what is really happening on the ground. >> jamie: several generals recommended a slower withdrawal schedule than what president obama wants and is currently going to get. do you think we'll hear from them again? or in the military way will they just do what they have been asked to do? >> the thing about the military professionals, you have two options. you can execute the orders as best you can or resign. you don
Search Results 0 to 13 of about 14 (some duplicates have been removed)